The CollegeBoard logo

Contact:

Deborah Davis
The College Board
212-713-8052
communications@collegeboard.org

More than 2 Million Students from Nearly 17,000 High Schools Taking Advanced Placement Program® (AP®) Exams This Month

Students will receive score reports in July

NEW YORK, May 2, 2013 /PRNewswire/ — From May 6 to May 17, more than two million students from approximately 17,000 U.S. high schools will complete nearly four million college-level Advanced Placement Program® (AP®) Exams in 30 subjects ranging from math and science to psychology and world languages. According to data released in the College Board’s 9th Annual AP Report to the Nation, more high school graduates are participating — and succeeding — in college-level AP courses and exams than ever before.

Research consistently shows that AP students that earn advanced placement into college course work perform as well as — or better than — college students who first completed the introductory course at a college or university. In fact, students who succeed on AP Exams during high school typically experience greater overall academic success in college, and are more likely than their non-AP peers to graduate from college and to graduate on time, experiencing lower college costs than the majority of American college students.

“Succeeding on one or more AP Exams demonstrates to college admission officers that a student has mastered introductory college-level course work in that subject,” said Trevor Packer, senior vice president of the Advanced Placement Program at the College Board. “Success in AP also qualifies students for college credit, advanced placement or both at thousands of four-year colleges and universities across the country — helping them graduate on time and make the most of their time on campus.”

The Advanced Placement Program was created more than 50 years ago to provide students with the opportunity to place into the college courses for which their AP experience best prepared them. Over time, colleges and universities increasingly began to grant credit for introductory-level courses based on AP Exam scores. Last year, 3,308 U.S. colleges and universities received AP scores for credit, placement and/or consideration in the admission process, with the vast majority of those colleges and universities offering credit in one or more subjects based on successful AP Exam scores. Today, most colleges and universities grant credit, advanced placement or both for an AP Exam score of 3 or higher on the 5-point AP scale.

The direct involvement of college faculty ensures that AP curricula are comparable in content to introductory college courses, and that the examination standards to which AP students are held are the same as those to which the faculty hold their own college students. Approximately 5,400 college faculty are engaged in designing AP courses and exams. These faculty members review each AP teacher’s course syllabus, develop and validate AP curricula, and write and evaluate AP Exam questions to establish standards aligned with college-level performance.

At the conclusion of AP testing each May, the multiple-choice sections of the exams are sent for automatic scoring by computer while the free-response sections are scored by thousands of college faculty and AP teachers who gather for the annual AP Reading.

This year marks the first time students will be able to receive their AP Exam scores online, directly from the College Board. AP students can visit apscore.org to sign up to receive their scores when they are released in early July.

For more information on the AP Program, visit apstudent.collegeboard.org/home, and for more on AP credit policies at colleges across the country, visit collegesearch.collegeboard.com/apcreditpolicy/index.jsp.

About the College Board
The College Board is a mission-driven not-for-profit organization that connects students to college success and opportunity. Founded in 1900, the College Board was created to expand access to higher education. Today, the membership association is made up of over 6,000 of the world’s leading educational institutions and is dedicated to promoting excellence and equity in education. Each year, the College Board helps more than seven million students prepare for a successful transition to college through programs and services in college readiness and college success — including the SAT® and the Advanced Placement Program®. The organization also serves the education community through research and advocacy on behalf of students, educators and schools. For further information, visit www.collegeboard.org.

###

Contact:

Deborah Davis
The College Board
212-713-8052
communications@collegeboard.org

Videos

Photo Gallery

Students who succeed on AP Exams in high school experience greater academic success in college.
Students who succeed on AP Exams in high school experience greater academic success in college.
Students who succeed on AP Exams during high school are more likely than their non-AP peers to graduate from college and to graduate on time.
Students who succeed on AP Exams during high school are more likely than their non-AP peers to graduate from college and to graduate on time.
Last year, 3,308 U.S. colleges and universities received AP scores for credit, placement and/or consideration in the admission process.
Last year, 3,308 U.S. colleges and universities received AP scores for credit, placement and/or consideration in the admission process.

Related Links

apstudent.collegeboard.org/home
www.collegeboard.org/ap-scores.html
aphighered.collegeboard.org/exams/scoring
collegesearch.collegeboard.com/apcreditpolicy/index.jsp
www.facebook.com/thecollegeboard

Find us on Facebook